Story image

Google’s Partner Interconnect service now generally available

19 Jun 2018

Google has announced that its Partner Interconnect service has now entered general availability, after the offering was introduced as a beta in April.

Partner interconnect allows customers who are building links between their data centres and the Google cloud platform to leverage partners to reach their nearest Google cloud platform (GCP) region.

Google says it allows private connections to GCP for organisations who don’t require the full 10Gbps of dedicated circuit.

The tech giant says the service also allows organisations whose data centres are geographically distant from a Google Cloud region or Point of Presence (POP) to connect to GCP, using partners’ connections.

In a blog post, Google Technical Program Manager Sankari Venkataraman says, “Partner Interconnect lets you connect your on-premises resources to Google Cloud Platform (GCP) from the partner location of your choice, at a data rate that meets your needs.

“(It) is ideal if you want physical connectivity to your GCP resources but cannot connect at one of Google’s peering locations, or if you want to connect with an existing service provider.”

With general availability, customers can now receive an SLA for Partner Interconnect connections if they use one of the company’s recommended topologies.

Beta users with one of those topologies will also automatically be covered by the SLA.

Organisations who already have a service provider partner for network connectivity can check the list of supported service providers to see if they offer Partner Interconnect service.

In Oceania, four service providers are listed as currently supported (operating in Sydney), including Equinix, Macquarie Cloud Services, Megaport and NEXTDC.

In Asia, the list is broken into four regions being Hong Kong, Osaka, Singapore and Tokyo, with operators including Megaport, Equinix, Softbank, KDDI and NRI included (but not in all geographies).

Other service provider partners across the US and Europe include AT&T, Verizon, Century Link, Colt, Orange, DE-CIX and Tata.

If service providers are not supported, organisations can select a partner from the list based on their data centre location.

Opinion: Moving applications between cloud and data centre
OpsRamp's Bhanu Singh discusses the process of moving legacy systems and applications to the cloud, as well as pitfalls to avoid.
Global server market maintains healthy growth in Q4 2018
New data from Gartner reveals that while there was growth in the market as a whole, some of the big vendors actually declined.
Cloud application attacks in Q1 up by 65% - Proofpoint
Proofpoint found that the education sector was the most targeted of both brute-force and sophisticated phishing attempts.
Huawei to deploy Open Rack in all its public cloud data centres
Tech giant Huawei has unveiled plans to adopt Open Rack proposed by the Open Compute Project in its new public cloud data centres across the globe.
Beyond renewables: Emerging technologies for “greening” the data centre
Park Place Technologies’ CEO shares his views on innovations aside from renewable energy that can slim a data centre’s footprint.
Opinion: 5G’s imminent impact on data centre infrastructure
Digital Realty’s Joseph Badaoui shares his thoughts on how 5G will transform data centre infrastructure now and beyond.
SolarWinds extends database anomaly detection
As organisations continue their transition from purely on-premises operations into both private and public cloud infrastructures, adapting their IT monitoring and management capabilities can pose a significant challenge.
Was Citrix unaware of its own data breach until the FBI got involved?
According to a blog post from Citrix’s CSIO Stan Black, the FBI contacted Citrix on March 6 and advised that international cybercriminals had allegedly gained access to Citrix’s internal network.